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PostPosted: Mon 16 Jan 2023 8:12 pm 
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scytale wrote:
djwebb2021 wrote:

3. A wife calls her husband "a Neaineo". Does anyone recognise this as meaning "my darling"?



It would be pronounced almost exactly like the Spanish niño - "(young) boy", which sounds far-fetched, but then again there's also the very common Irish word garsún, also meaning "boy", which clearly is from the French word with the same meaning.

Thank you for your view.


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jan 2023 5:23 pm 
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Nano is a Hiberno-English pet form of Nora. The spelling is just showing how Peig rendered it in Irish.

Shows a fairly common feature where English N was said as slender N by monolinguals or those with a weak command of English.

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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jan 2023 5:45 pm 
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djwebb2021 wrote:
I've finished Labharfad le Cách, but I've go some questions:

1. Ach do chuir na buachaillí suas é go raibh na pinginí ag Nóra agus dá bhféadfadh sé gabháilt timpeall uirthi agus í a phósadh, go mbeadh aige.

Gabháil tímpall ar dhuine - I can't find this in dictionaries, but does it mean (mirroring the English) "to get round someone", ie "to get someone to do something"?

"Gabháil timpall ar" is essentially equivalent to "mealladh".


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2. Ní haon dea-shúic thu.

This apparently means "you are no great shakes" (you are not such a great person). Does anyone recognise this?

It's a direct borrowing of the English phrase, i.e. s(i)úic is just "shake" said with Irish phonology.

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Ar sgáth a chéile a mhairid na daoine, lag agus láidir, uasal is íseal


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jan 2023 10:37 pm 
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An Lon Dubh wrote:
djwebb2021 wrote:
I've finished Labharfad le Cách, but I've go some questions:

1. Ach do chuir na buachaillí suas é go raibh na pinginí ag Nóra agus dá bhféadfadh sé gabháilt timpeall uirthi agus í a phósadh, go mbeadh aige.

Gabháil tímpall ar dhuine - I can't find this in dictionaries, but does it mean (mirroring the English) "to get round someone", ie "to get someone to do something"?

"Gabháil timpall ar" is essentially equivalent to "mealladh".


Quote:
2. Ní haon dea-shúic thu.

This apparently means "you are no great shakes" (you are not such a great person). Does anyone recognise this?

It's a direct borrowing of the English phrase, i.e. s(i)úic is just "shake" said with Irish phonology.


Thank you, Darran, for those answers! As you say, it is the wife, not the husband, being calling Neaineó.


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PostPosted: Thu 19 Jan 2023 5:46 am 
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An Lon Dubh wrote:
Nano is a Hiberno-English pet form of Nora. The spelling is just showing how Peig rendered it in Irish.

Shows a fairly common feature where English N was said as slender N by monolinguals or those with a weak command of English.


Wow. Good to know.


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