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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jun 2022 4:09 pm 
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I am looking to verify the translation and punctuation of "In ar gcroithe go deo" for an epitaph for my dad's headstone. I want to make sure that it is appropriate and that I have the correct punctuation (capitals, lower case and fadas). Thank you for any guidance you can offer.


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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jun 2022 5:22 pm 
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I think it'd be better as 'Inár gcroí go deo', using the singular (also inár is written together, with fada on the á).

And, as Antain Mac Lochlainn says in Cruinneas

Quote:
Nuair a bhítear ag tagairt do bhaill den chorp ar an mbealach seo, is gnách an uimhir uatha a úsáid i gcás na mball beatha sin nach mbíonn ach aon cheann amháin acu ag gach duine.


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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jun 2022 6:01 pm 
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galaxyrocker wrote:
I think it'd be better as 'Inár gcroí go deo', using the singular (also inár is written together, with fada on the á).

And, as Antain Mac Lochlainn says in Cruinneas

Quote:
Nuair a bhítear ag tagairt do bhaill den chorp ar an mbealach seo, is gnách an uimhir uatha a úsáid i gcás na mball beatha sin nach mbíonn ach aon cheann amháin acu ag gach duine.


Graiméar Gaeilge na mBráithre Criostaí says much the same thing but adds deirtear fosta inár gcroíthe. You'll find both versions in gaeltacht graveyards.

Cbrowne, it means 'Forever (for ever) in our hearts' and you can use either form 'inár gcroíthe/gcroí (note the fada).You might wish to consider using the traditional decorative Gaelic script.


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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jun 2022 6:26 pm 
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Thank you both for your replies. I didn't realize that inar was written together as one. Could you please explain why gcroi would be better than gcroithe? I thought we would use plural instead of singular as my dad (and eventually my mam will be added) will be remembered by many people?
We're originally from Dublin, so I want to make sure that it reflects that dialect too. My dad was an Irish language enthusiast and also a stickler for correct grammar, so, as you can imagine, I cannot mess this up! :) Thank you for your insight on this - it is most very much appreciated! Go raibh mile maith agat!


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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jun 2022 6:57 pm 
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cbrowne wrote:
Thank you both for your replies. I didn't realize that inar was written together as one. Could you please explain why gcroi would be better than gcroithe? I thought we would use plural instead of singular as my dad (and eventually my mam will be added) will be remembered by many people?
We're originally from Dublin, so I want to make sure that it reflects that dialect too. My dad was an Irish language enthusiast and also a stickler for correct grammar, so, as you can imagine, I cannot mess this up! :) Thank you for your insight on this - it is most very much appreciated! Go raibh mile maith agat!



It's croí because each person only has one heart; the ár is what signifies that it's plural. The use of the plural there is not a huge Gaelic thing.

Also, there is no dialect in Dublin, and what was spoken there traditionally, 150+ years ago, was likely probably a mixture between East Ulster, Connacht, and Ossraí Irish.


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PostPosted: Sat 04 Jun 2022 1:34 pm 
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Don’t miss the accents (á, í):

Inár gcroí go deo


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PostPosted: Sun 05 Jun 2022 12:04 am 
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This reminds me of the last line of the Hail Mary prayer. The singular is used (in both English and Irish) when you might expect the plural.

Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. (not 'hours of our deaths')
Guigh orainn na peacaigh, anois is ar uair ár mbáis. (not 'uaireanta ár mbásanna')


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PostPosted: Wed 15 Jun 2022 2:31 pm 
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I agree with: 'Inár gcroí go deo'. (fada x 2)

Sorry for your loss. Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam.

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 Jun 2022 2:45 pm 
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You may be interested in this story. The family fought very hard to be allowed to put those exact words on their mother's headstone.

https://westernpeople.ie/2021/06/17/wri ... rish-race/

_________________
Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Thu 16 Jun 2022 8:41 am 
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Saoirse wrote:
You may be interested in this story. The family fought very hard to be allowed to put those exact words on their mother's headstone.

https://westernpeople.ie/2021/06/17/wri ... rish-race/


Very interesting story, thank you! I didn't realize that a family could fight for 3 years just for the right to write in Irish. But what struck me was the decision of the church court. Always the churchmen know best! :bash: Good thing there is an appeals court.


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