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PostPosted: Tue 13 Jul 2021 2:56 pm 
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Hi, my issue of Cómhar has arrived, and I'm trying to understand this. It is an article that is addressed to Colm Cille (St. Columba):
Quote:
Nach agat a bheadh an time anois ar na meáin shóisialta agus cúrsaí cóipchirt i dtobar an amhrais sna clabhtaí.

You would have a real liking now for social media and matters of copyright in the well of doubt in the clouds?

I don't know what the well of doubt is, or why copyright is even brought into the sentence. This is the first time I've seen the word time too - the article is written by someone from Cois Fharraige, and so this may be a word found there.

Can anyone explain the meaning?


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PostPosted: Tue 13 Jul 2021 4:21 pm 
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djwebb2021 wrote:
Hi, my issue of Cómhar has arrived, and I'm trying to understand this. It is an article that is addressed to Colm Cille (St. Columba):
Quote:
Nach agat a bheadh an time anois ar na meáin shóisialta agus cúrsaí cóipchirt i dtobar an amhrais sna clabhtaí.

You would have a real liking now for social media and matters of copyright in the well of doubt in the clouds?

I don't know what the well of doubt is, or why copyright is even brought into the sentence. This is the first time I've seen the word time too - the article is written by someone from Cois Fharraige, and so this may be a word found there.

Can anyone explain the meaning?


Colm Cille was said to be a copyright infringer. (He copied a book secretly.)

Time - I'd think it is the English word time [taım] and probably an-time ['an'taım] (great time) instead of an time [ə tımə] (the tenderness).
Tá an-time agat is a often heard phrase.


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PostPosted: Tue 13 Jul 2021 4:59 pm 
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Thank you. My translation was with an eye on time in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, where it means "weakness", and I thought it meant a weakness for something (fonn chun ruda). But your version makes more sense. and I didn't know Colm Cille was a copyright infringer!!!

Of course, there was no copyright law then, but you could still have offended someone by copying his book!


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PostPosted: Thu 15 Jul 2021 8:11 pm 
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Yeah "time" is the English word. Pretty much every native speaker in Conamara says it.
You will have a great time. Beidh an-time 'ad.
Sometimes you see it written as taidhm.

Clabhtaí - That's the Conamara word for clouds. We seldom use "néalta".


I assume the clouds mentioned here are computer storage in the cloud, not real clouds.


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PostPosted: Fri 16 Jul 2021 12:00 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
Yeah "time" is the English word. Pretty much every native speaker in Conamara says it.
You will have a great time. Beidh an-time 'ad.
Sometimes you see it written as taidhm.

Clabhtaí - That's the Conamara word for clouds. We seldom use "néalta".


I assume the clouds mentioned here are computer storage in the cloud, not real clouds.


What about scamall? Do you use that word in Conemara?


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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul 2021 11:38 pm 
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djwebb2021 wrote:
Bríd Mhór wrote:
Yeah "time" is the English word. Pretty much every native speaker in Conamara says it.
You will have a great time. Beidh an-time 'ad.
Sometimes you see it written as taidhm.

Clabhtaí - That's the Conamara word for clouds. We seldom use "néalta".


I assume the clouds mentioned here are computer storage in the cloud, not real clouds.


What about scamall? Do you use that word in Conemara?


Yes, but more often as an adverb - Tá sé scamallach. As there is no such word as "clabhtach", or "néaltach" either for that matter, as far as I know at least I've never heard those words used.


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PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul 2021 12:09 am 
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Thank you. It's interesting to know which words are said where.


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