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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 12:12 pm 
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Here is Psalm 134 verse 1

An Bíobla Naofa
Téanaigi agus molaigí an Tiarna,
a sheirbhíseacha uile an Tiarna
a bhíonn in bhur seasamh i dteach an Tiarna,
i gcúirteanna theach ár nDé.

Google Translate:
Go and praise the Lord,
All the servants of the Lord,
who are standing in the house of the Lord,
in the courts of the house of our God.

Question:
Psalm 134, 3rd line of verse 1:
a bhíonn in bhur seasamh i dteach an Tiarna

Google translates this to:
"who are standing in the house of the Lord"

However, https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/seasamh says that the word seasamh can mean "Upright position".

Would it be okay to translate this part of psalm 134 to:
"Who are in an upright position in the house of the Lord

This may seem like a minor thing, but when I wake up at night I try to read my bible before I go back to bed. I never am standing whilst doing so, but sometimes I make an attempt to have good posture.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 1:19 pm 
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Posts: 395
Location: Corcaigh
msv133 wrote:
Here is Psalm 134 verse 1

An Bíobla Naofa
Téanaigi agus molaigí an Tiarna,
a sheirbhíseacha uile an Tiarna
a bhíonn in bhur seasamh i dteach an Tiarna,
i gcúirteanna theach ár nDé.

Google Translate:
Go and praise the Lord,
All the servants of the Lord,
who are standing in the house of the Lord,
in the courts of the house of our God.

Question:
Psalm 134, 3rd line of verse 1:
a bhíonn in bhur seasamh i dteach an Tiarna

Google translates this to:
"who are standing in the house of the Lord"

However, https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/seasamh says that the word seasamh can mean "Upright position".

Would it be okay to translate this part of psalm 134 to:
"Who are in an upright position in the house of the Lord

This may seem like a minor thing, but when I wake up at night I try to read my bible before I go back to bed. I never am standing whilst doing so, but sometimes I make an attempt to have good posture.


Strictly speaking, the use of "a bhíonn" here means that "who are standing" isn't quite the right translation. It means "who stand in the house". And the use of "bhur" means that it's being addressed to "you" (plural) as readers (which is also expressed by the vocative in the previous line, a sheirbhíseacha, "you servants"). This is a better translation:

"Go and praise the Lord,
all you servants of the Lord
who stand in the house of the Lord,
in the courts of the house of our God."

As for your question, you cannot translate this as meaning "in an upright position". The "upright position" interpretation of seasamh means standing up straight. It is to be understood as opposed to being stooped over, squatting down, or cowering, for example, but it still requires being on your feet. It cannot mean sitting or lying in an "upright position".

As for translating the verse, you can tell from the context that the use of seasamh just means "stand" as opposed to "stand upright", so the "upright" interpretation is irrelevant here.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 1:34 pm 
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Peadar Ua Laoghaire's translation:

1 Molaidh-se ainm an Tiarna;
sibhse, a sheirbhísigh, molaidh an Tiarna:
2 Sibhse atá ’núr seasamh i dtigh an Tiarna
in árasaibh tí ár nDia.

"In bhur" is highly suboptimal for something pronounced "núr" (one syllable).
I dtigh: this is dative, and so "teach" is suboptimal.
ár nDia: this is a phrase and so the genitive should not be declined in the phrase as a whole. Ár nDé is suboptimal.

An Bíobla Naofa is a poor translation into a form of Irish without native speakers devised by a committee of learners in Dublin.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 1:36 pm 
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The Douay has:

1 Praise ye the name of the Lord: O you his servants, praise the Lord: 2 You that stand in the house of the Lord, in the courts of the house of our God.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue 07 May 2024 3:50 pm
Posts: 19
Thanks so much! I appreciate your guy's help more than you know.

Could somebody link me to a better translation of the Bible into Irish? My main reason for learning Irish is that I want to learn to say scripture in Irish... bummer that an Biobla Naofa is lacking; on the internet it seems to be the most popular one.

Also, I want the whole bible, not just the new testament. Bonus points for "Apocryphal" works (the extra books from Catholic cannon, Ethiopian Ecoch, Book of Jubilees, Testaments of the Patriarchs, and anything else people here might recommend.)


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 4:46 pm 
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well it depends on your point of view. Ade might say it is Gaeltacht Irish that is lacking, and the Official Standard is the thing to go for. See https://corkirish.wordpress.com/the-bib ... ork-irish/ for most of the Old Testament in Cork Irish.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 7:39 pm 
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Location: Corcaigh
djwebb2021 wrote:
well it depends on your point of view. Ade might say it is Gaeltacht Irish that is lacking, and the Official Standard is the thing to go for. See https://corkirish.wordpress.com/the-bib ... ork-irish/ for most of the Old Testament in Cork Irish.


It's about as likely as you saying it yourself. :rolleyes:


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 8:02 pm 
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Ade wrote:
djwebb2021 wrote:
well it depends on your point of view. Ade might say it is Gaeltacht Irish that is lacking, and the Official Standard is the thing to go for. See https://corkirish.wordpress.com/the-bib ... ork-irish/ for most of the Old Testament in Cork Irish.


It's about as likely as you saying it yourself. :rolleyes:

OK. Thanks for clarifying that.


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 8:31 pm 
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Very interesting to read about what Cork Irish was versus the "Standard" Irish. So.. Cork is different than the Munster Dialect?

BTW thanks for the link.. Just what I was looking for!! Even a "dictionary" document that includes some pronunciation. Thanks again!


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PostPosted: Wed 15 May 2024 8:52 pm 
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msv133 wrote:
Very interesting to read about what Cork Irish was versus the "Standard" Irish. So.. Cork is different than the Munster Dialect?

BTW thanks for the link.. Just what I was looking for!! Even a "dictionary" document that includes some pronunciation. Thanks again!


Cork is a county in the Province of Munster. As such, Cork Irish is a sub-set of Munster Irish.


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