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PostPosted: Fri 28 Aug 2020 6:01 pm 
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After losing my wife due to infidelity, my close friend dying in an accident, nearly dying myself, and the seemingly endless stream of pain following; I am looking to change my name as representation of my ability to survive, adapt, and of the wolf-like pack of people I consider family that helped me.

I would like some help in deriving a name from at least "survivor". I've tried to find these things myself and learned that there are very few resources online for the task.


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PostPosted: Thu 03 Sep 2020 10:41 pm 
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morningelephant wrote:
After losing my wife due to infidelity, my close friend dying in an accident, nearly dying myself, and the seemingly endless stream of pain following; I am looking to change my name as representation of my ability to survive, adapt, and of the wolf-like pack of people I consider family that helped me.

I would like some help in deriving a name from at least "survivor". I've tried to find these things myself and learned that there are very few resources online for the task.

Most surnames of Gaelic origin are based on the name or nickname of a real or putative ancestor, or a characteristic of that ancestor. MacDonald (Mac Dhòmhnaill) is obviously "son of Donal" (the "d" got added later on, when anglicization of names was happening), whereas Campbell comes from Caimbeul, meaning "crooked (or bent) mouth" (the ancestor either had a deformity or was known for smirking, I suppose). So, theoretically, one could create a surname based on an ancestor being a real survivor, but there's no such name of which I'm aware, and there's no noun to use in creating it, because there's no noun meaning precisely "survivor" in Gaelic that I'm aware of, and several dictionaries I consulted were no real help.

The English concept of "to survive" is rendered in Gaelic (and Irish) as "to remain alive", so in Gaelic you'd have, for example, Mairidh mi beò, which can express any of these:
I will remain alive
I remain alive
I will survive
I survive

I tried to find a traditional name which conveys something of the message you want, but the closest I could get was names based on concepts of being a fighter or warrior. If you're open to something like that, I can suggest some possibilities.

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PostPosted: Mon 07 Sep 2020 6:26 am 
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CaoimhínSF wrote:
morningelephant wrote:
After losing my wife due to infidelity, my close friend dying in an accident, nearly dying myself, and the seemingly endless stream of pain following; I am looking to change my name as representation of my ability to survive, adapt, and of the wolf-like pack of people I consider family that helped me.

I would like some help in deriving a name from at least "survivor". I've tried to find these things myself and learned that there are very few resources online for the task.

Most surnames of Gaelic origin are based on the name or nickname of a real or putative ancestor, or a characteristic of that ancestor. MacDonald (Mac Dhòmhnaill) is obviously "son of Donal" (the "d" got added later on, when anglicization of names was happening), whereas Campbell comes from Caimbeul, meaning "crooked (or bent) mouth" (the ancestor either had a deformity or was known for smirking, I suppose). So, theoretically, one could create a surname based on an ancestor being a real survivor, but there's no such name of which I'm aware, and there's no noun to use in creating it, because there's no noun meaning precisely "survivor" in Gaelic that I'm aware of, and several dictionaries I consulted were no real help.

The English concept of "to survive" is rendered in Gaelic (and Irish) as "to remain alive", so in Gaelic you'd have, for example, Mairidh mi beò, which can express any of these:
I will remain alive
I remain alive
I will survive
I survive

I tried to find a traditional name which conveys something of the message you want, but the closest I could get was names based on concepts of being a fighter or warrior. If you're open to something like that, I can suggest some possibilities.


Yes, I am open to that, thank you


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PostPosted: Mon 07 Sep 2020 5:08 pm 
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Here are some possibilities, with the Gaelic form(s) given first, then the most common anglicized form(s), and then the meaning. I couldn't find as many "hero" or "warrior" names as I expected (they appear to be more numerous in Irish forms).
A few things to note:
-- As anglicizing of names became common, some names of different origin ended up with a common anglicized form.
-- Some names have more than one anglicized form (not all possibilities are necessarily given here).
-- There are disputes as to the origin of some names. Gaelic surnames are among the oldest in Europe, so people have sometimes lost sight of the original meaning, especially as some of them merged into other names.
--These are Scottish Gaelic names, some of which also exist in Ireland, from either before or after the Plantation of Ulster, in one form or another. Some names traveled back and forth between Scotland and Ireland over the centuries in the Middle Ages, and ended up with different forms in different locations, or merged with other names in one place, but not the other.

MacFhionnlaigh / MacFhionnlaoich
MacKinley / Mackinlay
"son of the fair hero"

MacFheargais / MacFeargusa / Fearghasdan
Mac Fergus / Fergus / Ferguson
"son of the vigorous man"

Mac Eacharna / Mac Eachrain
Mac Eachern / Mac Kechnie / Mac Gahern
"son of the equestrian/horseman"

MacGuaire
Mac Quarrie / Mac Quarry
"son of the noble one"

MacMhuircheartaigh
McMurdoch / Murdock
"son of the navigator"

And here's one that comes a bit close to your desire for the meaning "survivor", which you will recognize from Shakespeare's play of that name. Note that the historical MacBeth was most likely not the villain whom Shakespeare made him out to be, and was seen by some as a hero.

Mac Bheatha
Mac Beth
"son of life"

_________________
I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Tue 08 Sep 2020 11:07 pm 
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Thank you very much for your help, i greatly appreciate it


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