It is currently Tue 17 Sep 2019 3:01 pm

All times are UTC


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 74 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 2:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 1149
vaerov wrote:
In need of a few more translations :D

I only need parts of the dialog that have (IRISH) next to them translated/spelled properly in Irish.

“What’s your name?” asked the doctor, sitting down on the chair next to my hospital bed.
Niamh O’Neal, (IRISH)” I answered, my words only a faint whisper.

(Is mise) Niamh (bean) Uí Néill.
Quote:
The doctor stared at me for a moment, then glanced at one of the life support machines.
“How old are you?”
Nineteen (IRISH).” Certainly, I knew my own age.

(Tá mé) naoi mbliana déag d’aois.
Quote:
“What did you say your name was?” he repeated, appearing to study my pupils.
Niamh O’Neal, born McKinnon, (IRISH)" I replied, deciding to clarify.

Niamh (bean) Uí Néill, (Niamh) Nic Fhionghuine roimh phósadh dom.
Quote:
“Okay,” said the doctor. “What year is it now?”
The year of our Lord 1553 (IRISH),” I frowned at this strange doctor. Didn’t he know what year it was?
“Alright, dear,” he said evenly. “Rest now.”

Sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna 1553 (= cúig [chéad] déag dhá fhichead a trí déag or míle, cúig chéad dhá fhichead a trí déag)
(I don't know what was more common in 16th century)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 2:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri 08 Jan 2016 11:37 pm
Posts: 125
Labhrás wrote:
Quote:
“What did you say your name was?” he repeated, appearing to study my pupils.
Niamh O’Neal, born McKinnon, (IRISH)" I replied, deciding to clarify.

Niamh bhean Uí Néill, (Niamh) Nic Fhionghuine roimh phósadh dom.


I was trying to come up with a translation myself and I wonder: would Niamh bean Uí Néill, de Chlainn Fhionghuin(e) as ‘Niamh, wife of O’Neill, from MacKinnons’ work? (also, should bean be lenited here? why?)

Labhrás wrote:
Quote:
“Okay,” said the doctor. “What year is it now?”
The year of our Lord 1553 (IRISH),” I frowned at this strange doctor. Didn’t he know what year it was?

“Alright, dear,” he said evenly. “Rest now.”
Sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna 1553 (= cúig [chéad] déag dhá fhichead a trí déag or míle, cúig chéad dhá fhichead a trí déag)


Would one answer a question ‘what year is it?’ with sa bhliain… (‘in the year…’)? I’ve only seen the phrase as sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna… myself, but always referring to events long gone, so literally meaning ‘in the year … something happened’. Wouldn’t one just answer this question with an bhliain d’aois an Tiarna … or sth like míle, cúig chéad daichead is trí bliana déag d’aois an Tiarna?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 3:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 1149
silmeth wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Quote:
“What did you say your name was?” he repeated, appearing to study my pupils.
Niamh O’Neal, born McKinnon, (IRISH)" I replied, deciding to clarify.

Niamh bhean Uí Néill, (Niamh) Nic Fhionghuine roimh phósadh dom.


I was trying to come up with a translation myself and I wonder: would Niamh bean Uí Néill, de Chlainn Fhionghuin(e) as ‘Niamh, wife of O’Neill, from MacKinnons’ work?


I know nothing about naming conventions in 16th century Ireland.
Perhaps (probably) a married Irish speaking woman would normally still use her "maiden" name without any change due to marriage (= Is mise Niamh Nic Fhionghuine).
So a different approach would be probably more useful: Is mise Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean (Sheáin or whoever) Ui Néill. (I am Niamh McKinnon, wife of Seán O’Neal.)

Quote:
(also, should bean be lenited here? why?)


No, it shouldn't.
It was a typo.

Quote:
Labhrás wrote:
Quote:
“Okay,” said the doctor. “What year is it now?”
The year of our Lord 1553 (IRISH),” I frowned at this strange doctor. Didn’t he know what year it was?

“Alright, dear,” he said evenly. “Rest now.”
Sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna 1553 (= cúig [chéad] déag dhá fhichead a trí déag or míle, cúig chéad dhá fhichead a trí déag)


Would one answer a question ‘what year is it?’ with sa bhliain… (‘in the year…’)? I’ve only seen the phrase as sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna… myself, but always referring to events long gone, so literally meaning ‘in the year … something happened’. Wouldn’t one just answer this question with an bhliain d’aois an Tiarna … or sth like míle, cúig chéad daichead is trí bliana déag d’aois an Tiarna?


A good point. You are probably right.

Reading some near-contemporary results in Irish Historical Corpus* would suggest something like:
The year of our Lord 1553 = An tríú bliain déag agus dhá fhichead ar chúig céadaibh ar mhíle d’aois an Tiarna
(modern spelling.)


* (e.g. "An seachdmhadh bliadhain dég ar chúig céduibh ar mhíle d'aois an Tighearna" = "A.D. 1517" in Scáthán Shacramuinte na hAithridhe by Aodh Mac Aingil, written 1616
http://corpas.ria.ie/index.php?fsg_word ... lfiles=yes
So they used ordinal numbers for years then.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 5:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 36
Location: USA
Thank you SO MUCH Labhrás and Silmeth! I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your help.

To confirm, "Is mise Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean Aedan Ui Néill" is Irish for "My name is Niamh O'Neal, born McKinnon." Did I get this right?

I've done research (as much as I could, using google :) ), and it appears highborn women took their husbands' names in medieval Gaelic Ireland. Not to confuse matters further, my understanding is that the proper anglicized naming convention for an unmarried woman's name went something like this: Neave ingen Cormac McKinnon (Cormac being her father). Does that sound right?

Lastly, is McKinnon an anglicized version of Nic Fhionghuine? I looked up "Fhionghuine," and it's translated as "Phoenix." I'm shooting for the last name to have the connotation of "love" or "beloved." Am I on the right track with McKinnon?

Thanks again! :GRMA: :GRMA: :GRMA:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 6:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri 08 Jan 2016 11:37 pm
Posts: 125
vaerov wrote:
To confirm, "Is mise Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean Aedan Ui Néill" is Irish for "My name is Niamh O'Neal, born McKinnon." Did I get this right?


Aedan is a variant of the name Aidan, which in Irish has a form of Aodhán, genitive Aodháin, so: (Is mise) Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean Aodháin Uí Néill (the í in should have acute above it), and it literally means: (I am) Niamh McKinnon, wife of Aedan O’Neal.

Aodhán, btw, according to Wikipedia is a pet name form of Aodh (anglicized as Hugh) and one Aodh Ó Néill (Hugh O’Neill) was one of the most prominent Gaelic lords fighting against the Tudor conquest of Ireland at the end of 16th century.

vaerov wrote:
I've done research (as much as I could, using google :) ), and it appears highborn women took their husbands' names in medieval Gaelic Ireland. Not to confuse matters further, my understanding is that the proper anglicized naming convention for an unmarried woman's name went something like this: Neave ingen Cormac McKinnon (Cormac being her father). Does that sound right?

ingen is Old Irish spelling, and probably anglicization, of a word inghean or in modern spelling iníon ‘daughter’. Neave ingen Cormac McKinnon thus would be anglicization of Niamh iníon Chormac Mhic Fhionghuine ‘Neave, Cormac McKinnon’s daughter’. The Nic in Niamh Nic Fhionghuine is a contraction of iníon Mhic … (daughter of Mac…, lit. daughter of a son of…).

vaerov wrote:
Lastly, is McKinnon an anglicized version of Nic Fhionghuine? I looked up "Fhionghuine," and it's translated as "Phoenix." I'm shooting for the last name to have the connotation of "love" or "beloved." Am I on the right track with McKinnon?


It is anglicized version of a Scottish Gaelic clan surname MacFhionghain, meaning ‘son(s) [= descendants] of Fionghan’, Fionghan being modern Scottish Gaelic spelling of the name of some historical clan’s chieftain, supposedly known to Wikipedia as Findanus (also called Fingon, or Findan). What’s the origin or the meaning of the name, I have no idea (see below).

Fionghuine and Fionghun are alternative forms of the names found in Irish, Fhionghuine and Fhionghuin are the corresponding genitive forms (that is, forms meaning ‘Fionghuine’s’, ‘of Fionghuine’), thus Irish version is Mac Fhionghuine. Daughter of a man named Mac Fhionghuine would be called ‘dauther of the descendant of Fionghun’: Nic Fhionghuine, while wife thereof would be [bean] Mhic Fhionghuine.

EDIT: there is a pretty good explanation how traditional Irish surnames work on Gramadach na Gaeilge (Irish language grammar) on nualeargais.ie.

EDIT2: Wikipedia claims the name Fionghuine means ‘fair-born’ (as in born fair-haired?).


Last edited by silmeth on Tue 02 Apr 2019 7:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 7:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 36
Location: USA
silmeth wrote:
vaerov wrote:
To confirm, "Is mise Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean Aedan Ui Néill" is Irish for "My name is Niamh O'Neal, born McKinnon." Did I get this right?


Aedan is a variant of the name Aidan, which in Irish has a form of Aodhán, genitive Aodháin, so: (Is mise) Niamh Nic Fhionghuine, bean Aodháin Uí Néill (the í in should have acute above it), and it literally means: (I am) Niamh McKinnon, wife of Aedan O’Neal.

Aodhán, btw, according to Wikipedia is a pet name form of Aodh (anglicized as Hugh) and one Aodh Ó Néill (Hugh O’Neill) was one of the most prominent Gaelic lords fighting against the Tudor conquest of Ireland at the end of 16th century.

vaerov wrote:
I've done research (as much as I could, using google :) ), and it appears highborn women took their husbands' names in medieval Gaelic Ireland. Not to confuse matters further, my understanding is that the proper anglicized naming convention for an unmarried woman's name went something like this: Neave ingen Cormac McKinnon (Cormac being her father). Does that sound right?

ingen is Old Irish spelling, and probably anglicization, of a word inghean or in modern spelling iníon ‘daughter’. Neave ingen Cormac McKinnon thus would be anglicization of Niamh iníon Chormac Mhic Fhionghuine ‘Neave, Cormac McKinnon’s daughter’. The Nic in Niamh Nic Fhionghuine is a contraction of iníon Mhic … (daughter of Mac…, lit. daughter of a son of…).

vaerov wrote:
Lastly, is McKinnon an anglicized version of Nic Fhionghuine? I looked up "Fhionghuine," and it's translated as "Phoenix." I'm shooting for the last name to have the connotation of "love" or "beloved." Am I on the right track with McKinnon?


It is anglicized version of a Scottish Gaelic clan surname MacFhionghain, meaning ‘son(s) [= descendants] of Fionghan’, Fionghan being modern Scottish Gaelic spelling of the name of some historical clan’s chieftain, supposedly known to Wikipedia as Findanus (also called Fingon, or Findan). What’s the origin or the meaning of the name, I have no idea.

Fionghuine and Fionghun are alternative forms of the names found in Irish, Fhionghuin and Fhionghuine are the genitive of the name (that is, the form meaning ‘Fionghuine’s’, ‘of Fionghuine’), thus Irish version is Mac Fhionghuine. Daughter of a man named Mac Fhionghuine would be called ‘dauther of the descendant of Fionghun’: Nic Fhionghuine, while wife thereof would be [bean] Mhic Fhionghuine.

EDIT: there is a pretty good explanation how traditional Irish surnames work on Gramadach na Gaeilge (Irish language grammar) on nualeargais.ie.

EDIT2: Wikipedia claims the name Fionghuine means ‘fair-born’ (as in born fair-haired).


Thank you once again for all the details and for the additional sources! I appreciate this tremendously!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 02 Apr 2019 9:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu 22 Dec 2011 6:28 am
Posts: 156
Location: Corcaigh
Labhrás wrote:
Sa bhliain d’aois an Tiarna 1553 (= cúig [chéad] déag dhá fhichead a trí déag or míle, cúig chéad dhá fhichead a trí déag)
(I don't know what was more common in 16th century)


MDLIII


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Fri 24 May 2019 3:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 36
Location: USA
I'm so happy the forum is back on!!! Please help with the following translations :D :D
:GRMA: :GRMA: :GRMA:

I wish to do it myself.
I'll make sure you get to then.
You did it yourself, Jane.
You made it possible, Jim.
You made sure that I could, Jim.

(The names are placeholders.)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Fri 31 May 2019 9:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 36
Location: USA
If anyone sees this, please help translate just these two sentences:

"You did it yourself."
I came up with, "Rinne tú é féin." Is this correct?

"I couldn't have done it alone." OR "I couldn't have done it without you."
My best result is,"Ní raibh mé in ann é féin a dhéanamh." I know this is not exactly right. I'm trying to say that the character couldn't have done it without the person she is addressing.

Thank you for any insight!

:GRMA: :GRMA: :GRMA:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Fri 31 May 2019 10:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun 04 Sep 2011 11:02 pm
Posts: 1449
vaerov wrote:
I'm so happy the forum is back on!!! Please help with the following translations :D :D
:GRMA: :GRMA: :GRMA:

I wish to do it myself.
I'll make sure you get to then.
You did it yourself, Jane.
You made it possible, Jim.
You made sure that I could, Jim.

(The names are placeholders.)

Ba mhaith liom mé féin a dhéanamh.
I wish to do it myself.

Déanfaidh mé deimhin go mbeidh tú in ann a dhéanamh mar sin.
I'll make sure you will be able to do it then.

Rinne tú féin é, a Jane.
You did it yourself, Jane.

Rinne tú é indéanta, a Jim.
You made it possible, Jim.

Rinne tú deimhin go mbeadh mé in ann a dhéanamh, a Jim.
You made sure that I could do it, Jim.

Quote:
I couldn't have done it alone." OR "I couldn't have done it without you."
My best result is,"Ní raibh mé in ann é féin a dhéanamh.

Ní raibh mé in ann a dhéanamh i m'aonar.
I couldn't have done it alone.

Ní raibh mé in ann a dhéanamh gan tusa.
I couldn't have done it without you.

Edited to make some corrections as discussed in later posts (I confused a and á).

_________________
I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 74 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group