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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Thu 03 Jan 2019 6:11 pm 
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vaerov wrote:
I have another question. This one is a bit complicated (at least to me). I need a character's Irish surname to have the meaning of "beloved." Is there an Irish surname that roughly translates to "beloved," or might one be made up and still sound authentic? The surname would exist in the 16th Century Ulster and would belong to one of the chieftains, so it would also be a clan name. I've been looking all over the internet, and the closest I've come to is " O'Ghrá," although I am sure this sounds very wrong to Irish speakers! :D Any help would be greatly appreciated!


Ó hIonmhaineáin, or in modern spelling Ó hIonúineáin, anglicized Noonan
But this is a Munster name.
Ó hIonmhaine / Ó hIonúine is an alternative version

Mac Ionmhain / Mac Ionúin
This is an Ulster (and Scottish) name, anlicized McKinnon, or Love

All these names are based on the adjective ionúin = beloved, dear (old spelling ionmhain) or the abstract noun ionúine (ionmhaine) = dearness, affection.

Ó Cárthaigh and Ó Searcaigh, which mean "descendant of Cárthach", resp. "of Searcach", both meaning originally "loving", now more prominent in Ó Searcaigh because there's still the noun searc = love
Both are Ulster (and Connacht) names.

Mac Cárthaigh is a Munster name.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Thu 03 Jan 2019 10:08 pm 
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Posts: 33
Location: USA
Labhrás wrote:
vaerov wrote:
I have another question. This one is a bit complicated (at least to me). I need a character's Irish surname to have the meaning of "beloved." Is there an Irish surname that roughly translates to "beloved," or might one be made up and still sound authentic? The surname would exist in the 16th Century Ulster and would belong to one of the chieftains, so it would also be a clan name. I've been looking all over the internet, and the closest I've come to is " O'Ghrá," although I am sure this sounds very wrong to Irish speakers! :D Any help would be greatly appreciated!


Ó hIonmhaineáin, or in modern spelling Ó hIonúineáin, anglicized Noonan
But this is a Munster name.
Ó hIonmhaine / Ó hIonúine is an alternative version

Mac Ionmhain / Mac Ionúin
This is an Ulster (and Scottish) name, anlicized McKinnon, or Love

All these names are based on the adjective ionúin = beloved, dear (old spelling ionmhain) or the abstract noun ionúine (ionmhaine) = dearness, affection.

Ó Cárthaigh and Ó Searcaigh, which mean "descendant of Cárthach", resp. "of Searcach", both meaning originally "loving", now more prominent in Ó Searcaigh because there's still the noun searc = love
Both are Ulster (and Connacht) names.

Mac Cárthaigh is a Munster name.


This is fantastic! Thank you so much once again!


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan 2019 3:42 am 
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Joined: Thu 22 Dec 2011 6:28 am
Posts: 156
Location: Corcaigh
Labhrás wrote:
Niamh Chinn-Óir a thugtar uirthi (mar gur bean a bhí inti)


Nílim cinnte fé sin. Dar léi féin, "Niamh Cinn Óir, is é m'ainm...", nó dar leis an leabhar seo (leathanach 238, vearsa a 3) leis an Ossianic Society.

Labhrás wrote:
And, though cailín is a masculine word, in vocative case lenition is necessary as well:

A Cháit, a chailín chinn-óir!

(cinn-óir = "head-of-gold", golden headed)


I've learned something new here. :GRMA:


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan 2019 5:16 pm 
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Posts: 1139
Ade wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Niamh Chinn-Óir a thugtar uirthi (mar gur bean a bhí inti)


Nílim cinnte fé sin. Dar léi féin, "Niamh Cinn Óir, is é m'ainm...", nó dar leis an leabhar seo (leathanach 238, vearsa a 3) leis an Ossianic Society.


Dar léi féin ... ;)

In "Leabhar Filidheachta Fá Choinne na Scoil" (1909) atá "Chinn-óir" séimhithe:
http://corpas.ria.ie/index.php?fsg_word=chinn-óir&fsg_class=W&fsg_pos=N&fsg_function=10
In "Gaethe Gréine" (1920) "Chinnóir" chomh maith
http://corpas.ria.ie/index.php?fsg_word=chinnóir&fsg_class=W&fsg_pos=N&fsg_pp=Both&fsg_years=1600-1926&fsg_function=10
Agus 63 sampla le "Niamh Chinn Óir" (gan fleiscín) in "corpas.focloir.ie"
http://focloir.sketchengine.co.uk/auth/ ... =%3Ddoc.id
(Níl ann ach cúig shampla gan séimhiú)


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Wed 09 Jan 2019 12:32 am 
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Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 33
Location: USA
Labhrás wrote:
Ade wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Niamh Chinn-Óir a thugtar uirthi (mar gur bean a bhí inti)


Nílim cinnte fé sin. Dar léi féin, "Niamh Cinn Óir, is é m'ainm...", nó dar leis an leabhar seo (leathanach 238, vearsa a 3) leis an Ossianic Society.


Dar léi féin ... ;)

In "Leabhar Filidheachta Fá Choinne na Scoil" (1909) atá "Chinn-óir" séimhithe:
http://corpas.ria.ie/index.php?fsg_word=chinn-óir&fsg_class=W&fsg_pos=N&fsg_function=10
In "Gaethe Gréine" (1920) "Chinnóir" chomh maith
http://corpas.ria.ie/index.php?fsg_word=chinnóir&fsg_class=W&fsg_pos=N&fsg_pp=Both&fsg_years=1600-1926&fsg_function=10
Agus 63 sampla le "Niamh Chinn Óir" (gan fleiscín) in "corpas.focloir.ie"
http://focloir.sketchengine.co.uk/auth/ ... =%3Ddoc.id
(Níl ann ach cúig shampla gan séimhiú)


I've got a few more, if that's alright:

1. "When I ride into battle, it is always to win." The part that needs to be in Irish is "When I ride into battle..."
2. "Come back to me, my love." I'd like to use the endearment "a rún" for "my love," if it's appropriate in the context (between lovers).

I also have a few quick questions:
1. Is the endearment "a leanbh" appropriate between a parent and a child, as well as between lovers? Is it something similar to "my darling?"
2. What about "a stor" or "mo stoirín?" Is it okay for friends as well as lovers, or only lovers?
3. How does “a rúnsearc" differ from "a rún?"

Again, thank you so very much for any insight!! :GRMA:


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Wed 09 Jan 2019 8:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu 22 Dec 2011 6:28 am
Posts: 156
Location: Corcaigh
vaerov wrote:
1. Is the endearment "a leanbh" appropriate between a parent and a child, as well as between lovers? Is it something similar to "my darling?"


No, it means my child in the literal sense. It wouldn't be used between lovers that I know of.


vaerov wrote:
2. What about "a stor" or "mo stoirín?" Is it okay for friends as well as lovers, or only lovers?


Just lovers, not friends. This one you could use with a child, though. Be aware, again, of the difference between a and mo. The former is to address the person, the latter is possessive of the person. So, if you're talking to the person and calling them this endearment you would use a stór and a stóirín. Note the length mark over the "o" in both stór and stóirín.


vaerov wrote:
3. How does “a rúnsearc" differ from "a rún?"


It's a different word. It's like the difference between calling someone my sweet and my sweetheart.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Wed 09 Jan 2019 11:34 pm 
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Posts: 33
Location: USA
Ade wrote:
vaerov wrote:
1. Is the endearment "a leanbh" appropriate between a parent and a child, as well as between lovers? Is it something similar to "my darling?"


No, it means my child in the literal sense. It wouldn't be used between lovers that I know of.


vaerov wrote:
2. What about "a stor" or "mo stoirín?" Is it okay for friends as well as lovers, or only lovers?


Just lovers, not friends. This one you could use with a child, though. Be aware, again, of the difference between a and mo. The former is to address the person, the latter is possessive of the person. So, if you're talking to the person and calling them this endearment you would use a stór and a stóirín. Note the length mark over the "o" in both stór and stóirín.


vaerov wrote:
3. How does “a rúnsearc" differ from "a rún?"


It's a different word. It's like the difference between calling someone my sweet and my sweetheart.



Thank you so much! Really appreciate it!


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 26 Feb 2019 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
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Location: USA
Three more phrases I'd love a little help with! ;)

1. When addressing a person, it is a mhuirnín or mo mhuirnín?
2. What is the proper way to say "I love you" to one's beloved? Is it Tá grá agam duit?
3. How would you say "Take me home."

Thanks again!!! :wave:


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 26 Feb 2019 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 1139
vaerov wrote:
Three more phrases I'd love a little help with! ;)

1. When addressing a person, it is a mhuirnín or mo mhuirnín?

a mhuirnín
There's a need to use the particle "a" in addressing. And this particle contradicts the use of "mo"
vaerov wrote:
2. What is the proper way to say "I love you" to one's beloved? Is it Tá grá agam duit?

Yes
vaerov wrote:
3. How would you say "Take me home."

Tabhair abhaile mé.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 26 Feb 2019 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 4:50 pm
Posts: 33
Location: USA
Labhrás wrote:
vaerov wrote:
Three more phrases I'd love a little help with! ;)

1. When addressing a person, it is a mhuirnín or mo mhuirnín?

a mhuirnín
There's a need to use the particle "a" in addressing. And this particle contradicts the use of "mo"
vaerov wrote:
2. What is the proper way to say "I love you" to one's beloved? Is it Tá grá agam duit?

Yes
vaerov wrote:
3. How would you say "Take me home."

Tabhair abhaile mé.



Thanks so much, Labhrás! :GRMA:


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