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PostPosted: Sun 11 Sep 2011 9:20 pm 
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Today Irish is printed using ordinary Roman lettering. Older books, however, use Gaelic letters called Cló Gaelach as illustrated in the first link below. Lenition was marked by placing a dot over the letter, instead of writing "h" after it as we do today.

Guide to old-style Gaelic type: http://nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/seanchlo.php?teanga=

Guide to old-style handwriting: http://nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/IrishCursive.pdf

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PostPosted: Sun 18 Mar 2012 3:25 pm 
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The old form of handwriting is identical to what is used in Scottish Gaelic and I was encouraged to use it in Scotland when writing for my teacher - a long time ago! But it's fun to keep it in occasional use even today.


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PostPosted: Sun 18 Mar 2012 9:22 pm 
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I didn't know there were still people who write in the Gaelic script in Scotland. Gaelic has been written in the Roman script much before Irish. I remember having seen a picture of an old Scottish bible (from the 18th century that was already in the Roman script, while Irish has abandonded the Gaelic script in the 1950s).

In Scottish Gaelic in the Gaelic script, would you put the length accents in the modern way ie. àèìòù, or in the "Irish" side?

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PostPosted: Mon 19 Mar 2012 11:07 am 
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There have been any number of fonts created for 'Celtic' over the last century and it's a complicated story - but there is one thing that I do find annoying and it's that you find the ubiquitous American Uncial everywhere, whether it's on touristy things or 'Irish Pub' windows or on anything that's supposed to be vaguely Irish, it's even influenced printed Breton and Welsh. So much so that many people take it to be the 'real thing'. Well I've got news for them - American Uncial was created by an Austrian called Viktor Hammer in 1943 in New York - one of the problems with it is that all the 'i's are í fada.
http://www.typeoff.de/2006/11/19/gaelic ... ial-fonts/


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PostPosted: Tue 20 Mar 2012 5:02 pm 
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Lughaidh wrote:
I didn't know there were still people who write in the Gaelic script in Scotland. Gaelic has been written in the Roman script much before Irish. I remember having seen a picture of an old Scottish bible (from the 18th century that was already in the Roman script, while Irish has abandonded the Gaelic script in the 1950s).

In Scottish Gaelic in the Gaelic script, would you put the length accents in the modern way ie. àèìòù, or in the "Irish" side?


I was being taught in Lochaber over 50 years ago - so I guess things are much changed. Long vowels received a grave accent except for certain question-words: dé - what?, có -who?. And several short words: cúig - 5, ás, an-dé (= inné). But I believe new spelling reforms have made all Gaelic long vowels take the Irish fada.


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