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PostPosted: Mon 29 Jun 2015 3:53 pm 
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Dear all,
My wife is a PhD student working on data-driven ways for pronunciation generation. She has worked on generating pronunciations for Scottish Gaelic, but as she does not know the language, she is not sure whether the generated pronunciations for the following example words that she wants to use is correct:

MHÀIL
FHUARAS
EUPHORT

May I please ask for your help to provide us with these pronunciations?

Many thanks,

Best
Alireza


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PostPosted: Mon 29 Jun 2015 10:21 pm 
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ghasemi wrote:
Dear all,
My wife is a PhD student working on data-driven ways for pronunciation generation. She has worked on generating pronunciations for Scottish Gaelic, but as she does not know the language, she is not sure whether the generated pronunciations for the following example words that she wants to use is correct:

MHÀIL
FHUARAS
EUPHORT

May I please ask for your help to provide us with these pronunciations?

Many thanks,

Best
Alireza


The first word means "rents" (plural of rent), but note that, if it's supposed to be a stand-alone word (i.e. not preceded by some other word), then it would instead be màil, because the "h" is normally a result of a pronunciation/grammatical process called lenition, which happens due to what precedes the word.

The second word looks like a conditional future form of the verb faigh ("get/obtain"), but it would normally be something more like dh'fhuaras (I'm not certain of the exact spelling). Same issue as to the "h" as mentioned above.

I don't have any idea what the third word is supposed to mean, and it isn't in any dictionary I have (and I have most of the modern ones and some older ones). It might be some sort of Euro-speak created by the EU Commission or its regulators, or perhaps by the Scottish Executive, but if so it's opaque to me.

If you clarify what the meanings are supposed to be, people here can try to help further. I'm hesitant to attempt to help with pronunciations for words without being sure what they are supposed to be.

For a basic resource for Gaelic pronunciation, here is a link to the Akerbetz site which has links to various pages where you can see the pronunciation of various consonant and vowel combinations spelled out in the international phonetic alphabet (IPA), and also listen to them being pronounced. You can download all of the files available there as well, for future use.
http://www.akerbeltz.org.uk/index.php?title=Fuaimean_na_G%C3%A0idhlig

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PostPosted: Tue 30 Jun 2015 7:11 am 
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Thank you very much. I just want the pronunciation, not the meaning.


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PostPosted: Tue 30 Jun 2015 4:07 pm 
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There's no native speakers on this forum, so I'm reluctant to give any direct advice. I would suggest instead getting in touch with someone at a Scottish university and asking for their help.

You could try the Sabhal Mor Ostaig ( smo.uhi.ac.uk ) or Edinburgh University's school of Scottish Studies ( http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments ... sh-studies ) for starters.

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PostPosted: Tue 30 Jun 2015 4:10 pm 
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A Chaoimhín,

Euphort is almost definitely a place name -- there are several sea-lochs ending -phort in the outer islands where the Vikings ruled for longest.

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PostPosted: Tue 30 Jun 2015 4:15 pm 
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Found it -- North Uist. Note variant spelling "Euphoirt" on Google Maps -- I think that's been erroneously taken from the genitive in "Oban Loch Euphoirt" and similar.

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PostPosted: Tue 30 Jun 2015 9:33 pm 
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Caoimhín,
There's no dh' for fhuaras in most dialects as fhuair is an exception where FH is pronounced [h].

Ghasemi,
I see that someone elsewhere gave you [uərəs] for fhuaras -- it should actually be [huərəs]

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PostPosted: Wed 01 Jul 2015 8:53 pm 
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Quote:
Euphort is almost definitely a place name -- there are several sea-lochs ending -phort in the outer islands where the Vikings ruled for longest.


Quote:
Found it -- North Uist. Note variant spelling "Euphoirt" on Google Maps -- I think that's been erroneously taken from the genitive in "Oban Loch Euphoirt" and similar.


Thanks for the info, Niall. A place name never occurred to me, although I thought it might be Euro-speak for something like "European port" (from the same folks who gave us "pig meat" for pork).

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PostPosted: Wed 01 Jul 2015 10:43 pm 
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I think the -phort bit comes from fjorð, which is why it's rendered as -forth in English.

(It's no concidence that this looks the same as "the River Forth", as the "river" bit is a recent introduction. Traditionally it was just "The Forth" (as with most rivers in English) which was essentially just "The fjord" in origin.)

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