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PostPosted: Mon 11 Mar 2019 8:39 pm 
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Hello,

I'm working on getting a tattoo and I would like to have the phrase "With you, I am home" in Gaeilge. Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated. The best I was able to find was "Le leatsa, tá mé sa bhaile", but I was told that is not 100% correct.

Thank you so much in advance!!

- Amanda :)


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PostPosted: Mon 11 Mar 2019 10:07 pm 
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cherri0196 wrote:
The best I was able to find was "Le leatsa, tá mé sa bhaile"

In "Le leatsa" "with" is double ("with with-you").
A relative clause is necessary (Is leatsa atá mé ... = It is with you that I am ...) "Is" can be left out.

Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile.


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 3:31 am 
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Labhrás wrote:
cherri0196 wrote:
The best I was able to find was "Le leatsa, tá mé sa bhaile"

In "Le leatsa" "with" is double ("with with-you").
A relative clause is necessary (Is leatsa atá mé ... = It is with you that I am ...) "Is" can be left out.

Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile.


:good:


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 11:23 am 
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Thank you so much for the reply, and information. Just to confirm "Is Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile" translates to "It is with you that I am home", but if I remove the "Is" and just use "Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile" that translates to "With you I am home"?? Is that correct?

Thank you again for your help! It is much appreciated :-)

- Amanda


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 12:54 pm 
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cherri0196 wrote:
Thank you so much for the reply, and information. Just to confirm "Is Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile" translates to "It is with you that I am home", but if I remove the "Is" and just use "Leatsa atá mé sa bhaile" that translates to "With you I am home"?? Is that correct?

Thank you again for your help! It is much appreciated :-)

- Amanda


Oh, a good question, actually.
In Irish, word order is very strict. So, if something has to be fronted, a relative clause is necessary and the whole sentence is an "is sentence", regardless of "is" is used or not. The translation is the same. ("It is ..." is just a very verbatim translation as well regardless whether there is "is" or not - the construction is the same.)

So "(Is) leatsa atá mé sa bhaile" is just a transposed version of "Tá mé sa bhaile leatsa" (I am home with you) - only with a focus on "with you".
(The -sa ending in leatsa provides further focus on "you")

But what you want to say is probably that you are home because you are with someone else.
So, I'm not sure if the Irish sentence really does mean that, too (or that you are just at home and accompanied by someone else)

I don't know if something more explicit would be better in Irish.
Perhaps something as long as:
De bharr a bheith leatsa mothaím a bheith sa bhaile. (Because I am with you I feel to be at home)

Let's see what others have to say. ;)


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 2:47 pm 
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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
I'm worried that the meaning is lost. I'm reading that and thinking it's just an emphatic way of saying "I'm home with you" (as in "you and I are physically in the same house") and losing the implication that "wherever you are is my home."

Perhaps "Nuair atá muid le chéile, tá mé sa bhaile" (When we're together, I am home)?

Wait for more.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 2:50 pm 
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Labhrás wrote:
cherri0196 wrote:
what you want to say is probably that you are home because you are with someone


Yes, correct. Basically I'm trying to find a phrase that basically means that as long as I am with this person, then I'm always home. I'm open to alternative verbiage. It doesn't have to be verbatim, if the translation doesn't make sense. The meaning behind the words, and the correct translation is more important to me. :-)

Thank you again for your help and time with this.

- Amanda


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PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar 2019 2:52 pm 
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Redwolf wrote:
Perhaps "Nuair atá muid le chéile, tá mé sa bhaile" (When we're together, I am home)?


That's beautiful! Thank you, Redwolf!!! I'll still wait for input from others, but this is the correct idea of what I am going for. :-)

- Amanda


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar 2019 1:39 am 
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Redwolf wrote:
I'm worried that the meaning is lost. I'm reading that and thinking it's just an emphatic way of saying "I'm home with you" (as in "you and I are physically in the same house") and losing the implication that "wherever you are is my home."

Perhaps "Nuair atá muid le chéile, tá mé sa bhaile" (When we're together, I am home)?

Wait for more.

Redwolf


Nice.


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar 2019 1:57 pm 
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Redwolf wrote:
"Nuair atá muid le chéile, tá mé sa bhaile" (When we're together, I am home)?


:good:


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