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 Post subject: Illaunricmonia
PostPosted: Wed 26 Dec 2018 4:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon 05 Mar 2018 7:17 pm
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I have just been looking out at a small island called Illaunricmonia. A neighbour says it was so named as turf was cut from the island. Could someone please give me a translation (the little island is off the SW coast of Cork near Schull)?
Also, if possible, could someone translate its nearby neighbouring island Carrignashoggee.
Thanks for your help


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 Post subject: Re: Illaunricmonia
PostPosted: Wed 26 Dec 2018 5:51 pm 
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Joined: Fri 09 Mar 2012 6:16 pm
Posts: 1500
Gunpoint wrote:
I have just been looking out at a small island called Illaunricmonia. A neighbour says it was so named as turf was cut from the island. Could someone please give me a translation (the little island is off the SW coast of Cork near Schull)?
Also, if possible, could someone translate its nearby neighbouring island Carrignashoggee.
Thanks for your help


https://www.logainm.ie/ga/13513?s=Illaunricmonia

Illaunricmonia 'Oileán Ric Muine'

Oileán means 'island', and muine means 'a copse/ thicket/ bunch of bushes/ trees'.

I'm Not sure what Ric means. According to one of the recordings of the placename from 1841-42, on the site I just cited, ric supposedly comes from rí(gh) 'king'. But, phonetically that seems doubtful, since rí(gh) is pronounced as /rí:/ (ree); so, one would expect Illaunreemon(i)a as an Anglicisation. Even in the period when the '-g' in ríg was voiced, it was still a hard 'g' sound, /ri:g'/ (reeg); and one would expect the name to be rendered as Illaunreegmon(i)a.

However, taking Ric to have come from rígh, it would mean 'The island of the king's thicket/ copse'.

Carrignashoggee is much easier to decipher.

https://www.logainm.ie/ga/1395078?s=Carrignashoggee

Carrignashoggee comes from Carraig na Seagaí, and means 'The rock of the shags (green cormorants)'.

Cian

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Is Fearr súil romhainn ná ḋá ṡúil inár ndiaiḋ
(Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin)

Please wait for corrections/ more input from other forum members before acting on advice


I'm familiar with Munster Irish/ Gaolainn na Mumhan (GM) and the Official Standard/an Caighdeán Oifigiúil (CO)


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