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 Post subject: Stuck on some old words
PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 4:12 am 
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Joined: Mon 23 Jan 2012 4:40 am
Posts: 9
Haigh a chairde,

I've been neglecting my Irish for a good while now, but I'm glad to have fallen back into the habit of actively practicing and studying it over the last two months. It feels good.

Currently I'm trying to translate a little document for a family member who's doing some genealogical research. This may have been written by a great uncle of ours - he only passed away a few years ago and I regret that we didn't find it sooner and weren't able to ask if it was his. It's one of those documents from the Schools' Collection on Dúchais.ie. The Irish is older and the text is harder to read (and seems to have been written as it was spoken by the student, rather than anything formal - there are a lot of inconsistencies), so there are two things I got stuck on:

-Tá a lán forach tighthe in mo cheanntar féin.
-Níor luadhad ainm na h-áite i amhrán no i rádh am ar bith.

I tried looking at the handwriting in the document to see if the transcript had a misspelling or missed marking, but it looked right. I also tired spelling the pronunciations out in different ways, or taking guesses as to what the words might be to see if something similar popped up but had no luck with those attempts, so here I am!

The page it's from is here if anyone needs or wants to take a look:
https://www.duchas.ie/en/cbes/5235172/5225588

GRMMA in advance for any help or suggestions! I'm looking forward to hanging out here a little bit more (I picked up Dúil again where I'd left off in March and am stuck on some things in there too.....one thing at a time, haha :reading: )


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 12:36 pm 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 1149
AnMarcach wrote:
Haigh a chairde,

I've been neglecting my Irish for a good while now, but I'm glad to have fallen back into the habit of actively practicing and studying it over the last two months. It feels good.

Currently I'm trying to translate a little document for a family member who's doing some genealogical research. This may have been written by a great uncle of ours - he only passed away a few years ago and I regret that we didn't find it sooner and weren't able to ask if it was his. It's one of those documents from the Schools' Collection on Dúchais.ie. The Irish is older and the text is harder to read (and seems to have been written as it was spoken by the student, rather than anything formal - there are a lot of inconsistencies), so there are two things I got stuck on:

-Tá a lán forach tighthe in mo cheanntar féin.
-Níor luadhad ainm na h-áite i amhrán no i rádh am ar bith.

I tried looking at the handwriting in the document to see if the transcript had a misspelling or missed marking, but it looked right. I also tired spelling the pronunciations out in different ways, or taking guesses as to what the words might be to see if something similar popped up but had no luck with those attempts, so here I am!

The page it's from is here if anyone needs or wants to take a look:
https://www.duchas.ie/en/cbes/5235172/5225588

GRMMA in advance for any help or suggestions! I'm looking forward to hanging out here a little bit more (I picked up Dúil again where I'd left off in March and am stuck on some things in there too.....one thing at a time, haha :reading: )


B'fhéidir:
Níor luadhad(h) = níor luadh (luaigheadh/luaidheadh) = One didn't mention/cite (past autonomous of the verb luaigh)

a lán forach = a lán foradh?


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 7:25 pm 
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Joined: Mon 23 Jan 2012 4:40 am
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Oh Labhrás, thank you! Those look like they could work!

I had actually come across forach but I suppose I wasn't sure what it meant. Would this be referring to ruins or old mounds/forts of some kind?


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 7:28 pm 
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Oops, I meant to say foradh, not forach.


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 8:09 pm 
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AnMarcach wrote:
Oh Labhrás, thank you! Those look like they could work!

I had actually come across foradh but I suppose I wasn't sure what it meant. Would this be referring to ruins or old mounds/forts of some kind?


I don’t know. It was the only word in FGB I found appropriate.
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/foradh

Quote:
foradh1, m. (gs. & npl. -aidh, gpl. ~).1. Lit:(a) Elevated seat; mound, platform; shelf, ledge. (b) Seat, residence, fort. 2 = FARA1.


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 9:43 pm 
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Might be "fothrach" = ruins -- suggested by David, our specialist of West Cork literary Irish.

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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 9:52 pm 
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Lughaidh wrote:
Might be "fothrach" = ruins -- suggested by David, our specialist of West Cork literary Irish.


Yes, fothrach is much better.
fothrach tighthe (tí) = ruined houses


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Aug 2018 10:49 pm 
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Fothrach makes good sense! I was having a hard time imagining foradh in relation to houses, and there are no mounds/forts in that area at all, as far as I know. There are, however, tonnes of ruins, which would have been there even in 1938.


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