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 Post subject: Another Story
PostPosted: Wed 14 Feb 2018 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
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Location: 91 - France
The one I'm reading at the moment is 'The Cat's Place by the Fire' which has been translated into English by Eileen O'Faolain. It's in her book 'Children of the Salmon and other Irish Folktales' The original Irish version is in the 'Béaloideas' Magazine which you can read on JSTOR. While I fully recognise any storyteller's right to reshape and remodel a story in the oral tradition, I do feel that the original style has lost quite a lot in translation. I can give you the whole of it, if anyone's interested - it's not very long. I'm stuck on some of the vocabulary and unfortunately I can't always find what I'm looking for in Dinneen's Dictionary.

When orm follows iallach, surely that means that the obligation falls on oneself (ie the dog), doesn't it? So I don't understand how it's being used here.


MÁIGHISTREACHT AN TIGHE AG AN GCAT

Bhíodh an gadhar amuich le fliuchán agus fuacht fadó, agus bhíodh an cat istigh cois an teallaigh. Dubhairt an gadhar an lá seo, agus é fliuch báidhte : "Tá áit chompóirteach agat," leis an gcat, ach ní bheidh sé níos mó agat nó go bhfeicidh mise a bhfuil iallach orm féin a bheith amuich 'chuile dhroch-lá agus tusa istigh."

The Cat's Place by the Fire

From bygone times the dog used always be out in the cold and the wet while the cat was always inside cosy by the fireside. One day when the dog was drowned and wet from the rain he said to the cat : "You are fine and comfortable inside always while I'm out in the cold and the wet, but I'm going to see to it that you'll not be inside any longer."


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 Post subject: Re: Another Story
PostPosted: Thu 15 Feb 2018 8:00 am 
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Joined: Mon 16 Nov 2015 1:36 pm
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Location: Brussels
franc 91 wrote:
When orm follows iallach, surely that means that the obligation falls on oneself (ie the dog), doesn't it? So I don't understand how it's being used here.

Could it be like if the dog said "I'll have to do something about that!"

For example, my Irish grammar is awful. I'll have to do something about that.

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 Post subject: Re: Another Story
PostPosted: Thu 15 Feb 2018 2:08 pm 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:29 pm
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The English isn't a direct translation. And the Irish looks a bit off too.

If "nach" was added I think the last sentence would be ok.

ach ní bheidh sé níos mó agat nó go bhfeicidh mise nach bhfuil iallach orm féin a bheith amuich 'chuile dhroch-lá agus tusa istigh.

"Tá iallach orm féin..." I am forced to....


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 Post subject: Re: Another Story
PostPosted: Thu 15 Feb 2018 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
Posts: 1824
Location: 91 - France
Ah d'accord, je comprends un peu mieux. Merci ;)


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