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PostPosted: Tue 25 Jul 2017 9:51 pm 
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Cúmhaí wrote:
Werewoof wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Nuair a Raibh Tú i do Chodladh Anseo


D'oh, simple misspelling. I even knew that. :facepalm:


unless I am mistaken this should be

Nuair a Bhí Tú i Do Chodladh Anseo


:oops:
It should, ar ndóigh.


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PostPosted: Fri 28 Jul 2017 6:19 pm 
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Cúmhaí wrote:

These two are wrong. When you get to chapter four, you will see why the first one is wrong. The second one is just a gender problem.
I won't tell you the correct versions unless you ask, as I am guessing you want to think about them yourself.


Sorry for the late reply,

Thanks for the response! I will assume I got the rest of them correct. :O
I will look into why the first is wrong, as chapter 4 is my next one to read. As for the second, I can only guess it is a rule I've forgotten or overlooked: I think it's because "doras" is masculine and therefore doesn't receive lenition for its adjective?

Cúmhaí wrote:
Unless I am mistaken this should be

Nuair a Bhí Tú i Do Chodladh Anseo


I'm still hazy on when exactly to use the "raibh" subjunctive, except after "go"; this does look correct. Thanks!


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PostPosted: Fri 28 Jul 2017 7:51 pm 
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Werewoof wrote:
I think it's because "doras" is masculine and therefore doesn't receive lenition for its adjective?
:good:

Werewoof wrote:
I'm still hazy on when exactly to use the "raibh" subjunctive, except after "go"; this does look correct. Thanks!

"raibh" is not normally a subjunctive (go raibh maith agat is the one location where it is common as such)
The vast majority of times you will use or encounter "raibh" is either the negative:
Bhí sé - he was
Ní raibh sé - he wasn't
Or as the uruithe or eclipsed version of bhí (equivalent to the present tense bhfuil)
An bhfuil tú? An raibh tú? - Are you? Were you?
Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú? Cén chaoi a raibh tú? - How are you? How were you?
Tá mé sásta go bhfuil tú ann. Bhí mé sásta go raibh tú ann - I am happy you are here. I was happy you were here.
Sin an fear a bhfuil a bhean in Éirinn. Sin an fear a raibh a bhean in Éirinn. - That's the man whose wife is in Ireland. That's the man whose wife was in Ireland.

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ЯГОН ТОҶИК НЕСТ ИНҶО???


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PostPosted: Fri 28 Jul 2017 8:09 pm 
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Cúmhaí wrote:
"raibh" is not normally a subjunctive (go raibh maith agat is the one location where it is common as such)
The vast majority of times you will use or encounter "raibh" is either the negative:
Bhí sé - he was
Ní raibh sé - he wasn't
Or as the uruithe or eclipsed version of bhí (equivalent to the present tense bhfuil)
An bhfuil tú? An raibh tú? - Are you? Were you?
Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú? Cén chaoi a raibh tú? - How are you? How were you?
Tá mé sásta go bhfuil tú ann. Bhí mé sásta go raibh tú ann - I am happy you are here. I was happy you were here.
Sin an fear a bhfuil a bhean in Éirinn. Sin an fear a raibh a bhean in Éirinn. - That's the man whose wife is in Ireland. That's the man whose wife was in Ireland.


Okay, this sounds right! I do see some patterns now. One case, as I was suspecting, is that "raibh" seems to be used in clauses that would equate to English's "that" clauses.
Tá mé sásta go bhfuil tú ann. Bhí mé sásta go raibh tú ann - I am happy (that) you are here. I was happy (that) you were here.[/i]

I'm sure there's more, but it's much clearer now. :) Thanks for this!


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PostPosted: Sat 29 Jul 2017 12:02 am 
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Werewoof wrote:
Okay, this sounds right! I do see some patterns now. One case, as I was suspecting, is that "raibh" seems to be used in clauses that would equate to English's "that" clauses.
Tá mé sásta go bhfuil tú ann. Bhí mé sásta go raibh tú ann - I am happy (that) you are here. I was happy (that) you were here.[/i]

I'm sure there's more, but it's much clearer now. :) Thanks for this!


To be more explicit, because it comes up again in several of the other irregular verbs (déan, téigh in the past, faigh in the future; more in the dialects) raibh is what's known as the 'dependent form' of the verb. It's used when the verb 'depends' on something else. So here, it is or an or go and the proper mutations apply (lenite, eclipse, eclipse respectively; raibh doesn't change because r neither lenites nor eclipses). The exact same thing happens with and its dependent forms. There, the dependent verb form is fuil, which can still be seen in an bhfuil, with the eclipse caused by an. It's a bit harder to see in níl, until you look at the etymology: it comes from ní fhuil, but because fh is silent, it was pronounced as níl. Some older texts will have it written as ní'l to show it still.

So if you see dependent forms of the verb mentioned, it's those that appear after an and . For most verbs, it's the same, but some of the irregular ones do have different forms still. I hope I didn't confuse you!


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PostPosted: Sat 29 Jul 2017 2:44 am 
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galaxyrocker wrote:
To be more explicit, because it comes up again in several of the other irregular verbs (déan, téigh in the past, faigh in the future; more in the dialects) raibh is what's known as the 'dependent form' of the verb. It's used when the verb 'depends' on something else. So here, it is or an or go and the proper mutations apply (lenite, eclipse, eclipse respectively; raibh doesn't change because r neither lenites nor eclipses). The exact same thing happens with and its dependent forms. There, the dependent verb form is fuil, which can still be seen in an bhfuil, with the eclipse caused by an. It's a bit harder to see in níl, until you look at the etymology: it comes from ní fhuil, but because fh is silent, it was pronounced as níl. Some older texts will have it written as ní'l to show it still.

So if you see dependent forms of the verb mentioned, it's those that appear after an and . For most verbs, it's the same, but some of the irregular ones do have different forms still. I hope I didn't confuse you!


Oh, okay! I do vaguely remember this now.

And no, you're fine, this isn't confusing at all. :) This all makes perfect sense... now, I just have to shove it into longterm for the next time I try to apply it. ;) But I do think I've got a better grasp on when to use "raibh" and other dependent forms. Thanks for the help!


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PostPosted: Thu 03 Aug 2017 6:56 pm 
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Hello once again!

Thank you all for your help so far. I wanted to do this earlier, and I don't know how many of you here play Irish music, but here are the songs (and some) that you helped me to properly name. For some titles, I went out on a limb to name to the best of my ability; please, if you would like to, correct me where I went wrong!

Here is the album:
http://imgur.com/a/HPWY8

I don't know when my paranoia of making mistakes will end, but I feel like I'm getting a better grasp on Irish's syntax and grammar. So here is my next batch of attempts for song titles:

Os Cionn an Matal - Above the Mantle
Scairteadh Gáire an Bhuacháin - Mr Buchanan's Belly Laugh
Díonta ag Déanamh Bolg le Gréin - The Sunbathing Roofs
Boladh Péine Taobh Thiar Do Thí - The Smell of Pines behind Your House
An tArracht san Íoslach - The Monster in the Basement
An t-Urlár Dheannachúil - The Dusty Floor
An Bhean Nach Chuimhnigh Sí a hAinm - The Woman who Forget her Name
Cuimhní an Tí a Raibh Sí ina Chónaí Ann - Memories of the House where She Lived
Cruinniú Mhuire le hEilís - Mary's Meeting with Elizabeth
Na Damáistí a Léirscriosadh Am - The Damages that Time Erases

If you could please verify my translations, I would as always be insanely grateful. Seriously, I appreciate this help immensely. And, once corrected or verified, I will certainly upload the songs with their proper titles to the album.

Sláinte mhaith!

-Jon


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