It is currently Wed 14 Nov 2018 9:38 am

All times are UTC


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri 18 Nov 2016 9:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri 18 Nov 2016 9:20 pm
Posts: 3
I wonder whether anyone can help with this?

I'm researching the Macleods of Lewis (Scotland) and have come across an old tradition saying that a father refused to give his daughter in marriage because "gun ro leum na ceann aig aird na gealaich" which seems to mean "she was crazy (lit. she had a leap in her head) because of the full moon".

This phrase 'leap in her head' makes me think of the phrase 'headstaggers' which, as far as I know, is used in Northern Ireland. Perhaps in the Republic too?

So, my question...is 'headstaggers' an anglicisation of some Gaeilge phrase - perhaps similar to the Scottish Gaelic phrase mentioned above??

Many thanks for your time!
William


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun 20 Nov 2016 12:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:29 pm
Posts: 2673
wulliam wrote:
I wonder whether anyone can help with this?

I'm researching the Macleods of Lewis (Scotland) and have come across an old tradition saying that a father refused to give his daughter in marriage because "gun ro leum na ceann aig aird na gealaich" which seems to mean "she was crazy (lit. she had a leap in her head) because of the full moon".

This phrase 'leap in her head' makes me think of the phrase 'headstaggers' which, as far as I know, is used in Northern Ireland. Perhaps in the Republic too?

So, my question...is 'headstaggers' an anglicisation of some Gaeilge phrase - perhaps similar to the Scottish Gaelic phrase mentioned above??

Many thanks for your time!
William


I don't speak Scots Gaelic. But that doesn't look like it could be the meaning. And I've never heard the English expression. Caoimhín or Lughaidh our Gaelic experts will be around soon.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun 20 Nov 2016 3:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri 18 Nov 2016 9:20 pm
Posts: 3
Thanks - it is old Scots Gaelic (written about 1865-1870) and so some of the spelling is archaic and/or phonetic.
As for 'headstaggers', I've heard a number of Northern Irish friends use it...you can see one usage of it here: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.p ... adstaggers

Thanks again,
William


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun 20 Nov 2016 9:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
Posts: 1894
Location: 91 - France
Staggers is the name of a disease in cattle and sheep - they tremble and have trouble standing up - somebody somewhere in NI adapted its use by adding the word to - head. As far as I can see, its use is restricted to Ulster.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue 22 Nov 2016 6:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun 04 Sep 2011 11:02 pm
Posts: 1378
The answer you got at Fòram na Gàidhlig seems to make good sense, and "akerbelts" is far more knowledgeable than anyone here:

Quote:
The second part actually means "at full moon", making the whole thing an elaborate excuse for her being bonkers due to the full moon - which isn't anyone's fault so nobody would be offended. A bit like the old-fashioned word moonstruck.

_________________
I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue 22 Nov 2016 7:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri 18 Nov 2016 9:20 pm
Posts: 3
Thanks CaoimhínSF. I hope I haven't given the impression of ignoring akerbeltz's thoughts - they're excellent. I was just summarising my understanding which is (mostly) based on what akerbeltz wrote.

I was posting on here to find out whether 'headstaggers' might be an anglicisation of some Irish Gaelic phrase...more out of interest than to further my understanding of the original phrase.

William


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group